Thursday Thoughts – Sallow, a Keystone Species

The old sallow (salix) standing in our summer garden is slowly ageing – and decaying. They seldom reach 100 years, but this one is even older. These trees are very important for the biodiversity, as almost 200 species of butterflies are dependent on it for feeding their larvae. And, so are many other insects too, like bees and bumblebees – in spring they can find food there during the first harsh months of the new year. Salix trees are also home for birds, mushrooms, lichen and mosses.

When we arrived in Spring 2019, our old man was still in one piece, standing in a pink field of sea thrift – but in autumn the same year, the middle part of him had fallen down.

This year we had to take down another of the oldest and longest arms from the trunk as it would not have made it through the winter.

But, as you can see, he is still standing there…overlooking the sea. And there is a new little one shooting up from the trunk of his old master. We hope he too will be a survivor when the old man is gone.

18 reaktioner på ”Thursday Thoughts – Sallow, a Keystone Species

  1. How wonderful that you still have this old tree which is more community than tree at this stage, as you say. I hope the young one will be able to survive. I haven’t seen one growing quite like this before. Is it alliums that are growing in the first picture?

Halva verket är läsarens - så, vad säger Du? As the second half is the reader's - I'd love to have Your line!

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