Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #165: Going Wide

This week, Patti is going wide – and so are we! ”What’s a wide angle lens? It’s any lens that is below 35 mm on a crop-sensor camera or 50 mm on a full frame. The wide-angle view is perfect for capturing a broad vista like a landscape, seascape, or cityscape.”

In the opener, I had to use a wide angle in order to show as much as possible of the paper cutting – but I still did not manage to get the whole width, 5 meters, in the same picture.

My first example is of an old ”light house” in Skagen, on the east coast of Denmark. Ca 1625 ”vippfyren” was invented by the Dane Jens Pedersen Grove of Elsinor. Vippfyr could be translated as ”tilt light house”, and worked via a lever lifting a metal basket with an open fire. The first of these innovations were set in Skagen, Anholt and Kolabacken, Falsterbo, Sweden.

I used a wide angle here to show the sense of a golden ”sea” in front, and the light house facing the open, blue sea.

Another wide angle – this time the necessity was…to catch the two giant platforms in the same picture.

And I finally used a wide angle to show the vastness of Råbjerg Mile, a migrating coastal dune between Skagen and Fredrikshavn, Denmark. According to Wikipedia, this is the largest moving dune in Northern Europe with an area of around 2 km2 (0.4 mi2) and a height of 40 m (130 ft) above sea level. The dune contains a total of 4 million m3 of sand. The wind moves it in a north-easterly direction up to 18 metres (59 ft) a year, but it was originally formed at the Skagerrak coast, more than 300 years ago.

For this week’s LAPC #165, we invite you to go wide and we’re looking forward to seeing your wide-angle views of people, places, and objects taken with your camera or smartphone.

Last week, Sofia’s Up/Down challenge gave us a multitude of beautiful images captured while looking up and down. A special thanks to Sofia for her creative and inspiring theme and for hosting the challenge!

Next week, I, Leya, will be your host for the challenge. Until then, please stay calm, kind and well.

Macro Monday – Shaping up

An early, chilly and dewy morning, I met this little bee.

He was frozen in his position and had to wait for the sun to dry him up.

I visited every second minute until he was back doing his business. – Hey, thanks for keeping an eye on me!

Thursday Thoughts – The walk to Grenen, Skagen

A two hours’ walk to reach the top end of Denmark, where the two seas meet – The North Sea and The Baltic.

The Skagen lighthouse – looking back when we started walking. We hoped to reach Grenen before sundown.
We could see the land’s end from our starting point, but as usual, the eyes do not tell the truth about the distance…

Tough winds and soft sand made the walk feel even longer. But the play of light and shadow over land and sea had me intensely occupied.

Sand finds its way in if you don’t wear the right clothes.

Finally there – some people running to get to the last tiny spot of land… and some even braved the waves for a photo.

A tough walk for small children – happy to have a strong dad at hand! And, we all made it just before sunset.

Lens-Artists Challenge #164 – Looking Up/Down

Sofia of Photographias is our host this week – welcome! In a way, she continues Amy’s lovely ”Keep Walking” by wanting us not just to look around ourselves, but also to look up and down:

”So, what have you discovered when you looked up or down? Were you surprised?”

My garden is still filled with fluttering wings and buzzing bees this autumn. Sunny days with no wind – and I go out in the mornings to enjoy the last colourful flowers, butterflies and bees. My Buddleias have grown very high, about three meters, so I mostly look up to find the little beauties eating breakfast in the warming sun.

I was surprised to see a common brimstone – they haven’t been here since Spring. Hundreds of butterflies come to my garden every day, but now in September mainly red admirals, peacock butterflies and small tortoiseshells. The occational comma and cabbage butterfly.

When I look down, I find the hydrangeas are already fading into their new beauty – laced and plumcoloured. I don’t really know which way I like them best…but these silent, warm Septemberdays, I so love them.

On our trip to Denmark some weeks ago, we walked to the northernmost tip of the country to see the North Sea and the Baltic Sea meet. The sky was spectacular, and we remembered the 19th century Skagen painters who used to come here because of the magical light.

Time to look down as we reached Grenen, where the two seas meet. A tough walk in the strong wind, but beautiful waters awaiting. Quite a special feeling to stand there in the flying sand to the sound of clashing waves. Michael Ancher’s famous A Stroll on the Beach seemed a bit far away though…

They say the two seas meet in different colours. It was rather dark when we finally got to the point where they do meet – but maybe you can see a faint difference in this photo if you look closely? Anyway, it is time to look both up and down when you come to a special place like this.

Please go to Sofia for more inspiration, and if you join us, please include a link to her post and use the Lens-Artists tag so we can all find you.

Patti at Pilotfish will be our host next week, 11th September. Until then, we are looking forward to seeing your ups and downs. Stay kind and cool.

Thursday Thoughts – The Iceberg

Aarhus again, and the Iceberg Building area. Fascinating architecture.

From the pictures I had seen before, it looked gorgeous, innovative and a must see.
As we passed the first building, we admired the apartements close to the water.
A modern Venice?

On reaching the Iceberg, we realised it clearly is best seen from the sea.

But, I just have to post on some of the area anyway.

No easy angles here… and I was a bit disappointed that they were building a high tower right next to this complex – see this in the first photo.

The area is well worth a visit – and I enjoyed walking there for an hour or two.