Lens-Artists Challenge #166 – Artificial Light

Some of us are living in the Northern Hemisphere, and we will soon be in need of more artificial light as we are moving away from the sun. Artificial light means man made light, but, I also learned something new – that candles do not count as artificial light.

So, how do we use artificial light? Simply because we need it to see, to do what we need to or want to do?

No, today we also use it for fun – for example in fireworks and for Halloween.

We use moving light too – here on the houses’ facades at the Lodz Light Move Festival.

And moving light – is always used in concerts. In fact I am so old, that I remember when the laser harp was made popular by Jean-Michel Jarre.

Artificial light can be used in so many art forms – this is an art walk at ARoS, Aarhus Kunstmuseum in Denmark.

Painting on Ipad instantly became a new art when the Ipad arrived some years ago – here a David Hockney at the Louisiana exhibition in Denmark.

We need light, artificial light – but, do we really need as much of it as we use? The costs can be high. The results are in many cases negative for nature and with that, also for ourselves. Newborn sea turtles die when they cannot find their way to the sea, and head towards the light of motorways and towns close to the beach. And that is only one example of many.

For some time I watch the coming of the night? Above is the glistening galaxy of childhood, now hidden in the Western world by air pollution and the glare of artificial light; for my children’s children, the power, peace and healing of the night will be obliterated. Peter Matthiessen

Thank you to Patti for last week’s fun, Going Wide, which set our eyes wide open to the world!

For this week’s LAPC #166, we invite you to throw some artificial light on things! Please use the Lens Artists tag to help us find you, and we look forward to ”seeing the light”.

Next week Amy will be your host – until then, be well and kind.

Thursday Thoughts – Papirsclip

We visited the Museum for Paper Art in Blokhus, Denmark. We hadn’t planned to, as we didn’t know it was there – but it opened in 2018 and is the only one of its kind in Scandinavia. Who can resist it? I have made so many paperclips over the years – as a child, and then with my own children too. I hope they will pass it on to new generations too.

The main exhibition was from the art of Bit Vejle – a famous psaligrapher with exhibitions all over the world. Right now she is in the US with a Chinese Dragon show.

She cuts everything by hand, with a pair of sharp scissors. The big oval with the tree measures 3×2 meters – the details are amazing. There was also a workshop for those who wanted to let their inner paper artist loose!

Bit Vejle is based in Norway, but was born in Denmark. She and her daughter were the founders of the museum.

In the header you see a paper theatre – a much loved art form in Denmark. Even the Danish Queen has made backdrops for some theatres, and she has played herself as well. She is a very talented woman, who, among other things, writes books and paints.

Thursday Thoughts

I am sending you a gallery of interesting artwork in wood, bronze, sand and more, from an outdoor exhibition in Denmark. You might recognize some fantasy figures, and Erik Röde, HC Andersen and The Pied Piper of Hamelin. The exhibition was really nice, and we were allowed to watch the skilled artists at work. Earplugs were handed out!

The beautiful painted wall was indoors, and decorated for a party. In the header, another hall decorated for a wedding.

Thursday Thoughts – Läckö Castle

We visited yet another castle on our tour to old friends some weeks ago. Läckö Castle, once voted the most beautiful Castle in Sweden.

I must confess I did not find it as interesting as Tjolöholm, but of course the looks of Läckö is maybe more of a castle with a princess waiting inside.

First we had a lecture in the King’s Hall, about the history of the castle, and then we were left to read ourselves and walk the tour on our own. There was not much of the original furniture left, but I did find a Narnia cupboard …

In the 17th century Sweden was a country of great power, so many of the paintings were from famous battles. Not my kind of art.

I found the floors to be an absolute dream though. They were laid like no other floors I have seen, and in fact this type of fitting the boards is called Läckö after the name of the castle.

There was a lovely walled garden too, and more of Miss Willmott’s Ghost (Thank you, Jude), a plant I have already ordered for my own garden next season. I just love this extravagant flower, and the story of the lady Willmott too – secretly dropping seeds of this flower in other people’s gardens…

The last picture shows a piece from the treasury at Läckö – the decorative vases used for single flowers in those days.

Thursday Thoughts – A Swedish Tudor Castle

Tjolöholm Castle is in many respects a fairytale castle. The castle was built 1898-1904 by James Fredrik and Blanche Dickson. In fact it was Blanche who finished it, as her husband died shortly after the plans were ready.

The young architect, Lars Israel Wahlman, combined the Tudor style with modernities from the turn of the century such as showers with circularly flowing water, electricity, central heating, and a vaccuum cleaner (so big and heavy that it had to be drawn by horses). The intention was to create a home that was both comfortable and dignified.

Parts of the castle were being renovated when we visited, which of course made it more difficult to take decent photos.

Some of the most impressive ideas and rooms were the bathrooms with the special showers. All ordered from Liberty in London – the worksmen as well!

I also loved the fashion exhibition, grand royal 19th century, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert depicted from majestic festivities to the family’s private sphere. The Dickson family had moved from England and bought Tjolöholm to build a new home. The style is Arts and Crafts, and the whole interior is intact. A very unusual thing – rather fantastic. The furniture, tapestery and almost everything indoors was bought from Liberty in London – a company that still exists.

The lady’s riding costume certainly makes for the side saddle…

Rooms I really loved seeing were the children’s rooms and the flower arranging room.

Then…rooms with very special things in them or special thoughts guiding their interior decoration.

I especially want you to look at the green carpet room. The entrance to the room was meant to lead the eye along the (very) green broadloom (?) and through the window, out in the green of the garden. To create a feeling of wholeness – indoors and outdoors nature. The player piano or pianola in the last picture, is one of the last existing, working pianolas. The many boxes on top of it contains pieces of music for the instrument. The lady, one of the guides, offered to play the pianola for us. It worked perfectly well!

There is much more to be seen in this charming Tudor castle, so I suggest you visit yourself someday.

There will be one more post from me on the Castle – and the beautiful castle garden. Hope you enjoyed a piece of the cake – I enjoyed your coming along with me!

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #151: From Large to Small

Patti invites us this week, for a different challenge. ”…pick a color and select several photos that feature that color. Start with a photo of a big subject in that color (for example, a wall) and move all the way down to a small subject in that same color (for example, an earring).” She reminds us of size constancy and the importance of easily recognizable objects for comparing. You will see some of this in my images, but in some there are no perfect objects for comparing.

So, should I go for my favourite – green, or…no, I think I will choose white! And I will tweak it my way.

I could make it easy for me and choose a B&W image – surely there will be much of white in it…

But, I don’t think that is what was expected of me. Instead I will chose a fluffy arctic white cotton grass.

The flower itself is not big, but together they make a massive impression.

And another massive explosion – of tiny water violets – makes for an almost whimsical White view… So, many small dots will finally conjure up that big wall.

Anyhow, let’s leave the wall for now, and go to the white skies over the old whaling station,

and lichen in spots. To me, white is still the dominating impression. But, are the houses Hobbit size under that big sky and can you hold the stone in the palm of your hand?

In this picture, white is no longer the main colour impression – but, the church is still a Big building…

Ribwort Plantain is a resident of my garden since long, and as a child I used to lie down in the grass, dreaming it was a star with plenty of planets swirling around it. Or a satellite sailing in the wind, the little white dots fluttering and flying in their own universe. I still love this plant, it always puts a smile on my face.

So, how is the relationship between large and small…how do we interpret what the concept says compared with the impression through our eyes? I do know one thing, that great walls are not only built of big bricks…but also of tiny and seemingly inconspicuous things. And That, is good to know.

Thank you, Patti, for a thought provoking, fun and diffferent challenge! Don’t forget to visit Patti and her inspiring site – and we hope to see you there under the Lens-Artists tag.

Special thanks also to Dianne Millard for hosting the Let’s Get Wild challenge last week. Her love of nature is passionate, as well as her photography. We were all entranced by your “wild” and wonderful photos.

Next week I will be hosting, at Leya’s, in LAPC #152. Until then, have a wonderful creative week and please stay safe.

Wordless Wednesday

A lovely day, feeling soft spring air – and welcome to visit Frank at Beach Walk Reflections, where you can breathe even more fresh air. Right now Tina is walking there, and tomorrow, Thursday, I will be there too. Quietly walking.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #148 – Spots and Dots

In one sentence, I’d describe myself as indescribable. But, I wouldn’t end it with a period. I’d end it with three dots. – Jason Schwartzman

My intension with this challenge, Spots and Dots, is … that you should have fun with it! But, also recognize and enjoy the different interpretations, meanings and importance of these two little words. Spots and Dots. Because even if they are small…they can make a big difference. In the written language for example.

Louis Braille created the code of raised dots for reading and writing that bears his name and brings literacy, independence, and productivity to the blind. – Bob Ney


It is said people with brilliant minds are eccentric, and 92-year-old Yayoi Kusama is no exception — she is obsessed with dots. Her dots may appear boring, but she has this incredible ability to create enchanting artwork of many variations with just the dots. I visited one of her exhibitions in Copenhagen some years ago – and totally fell in love with her art.

What about spots then? We all have spots, weak spots, blind spots etc. Here I spotted two quotes that I like – and use:

A leopard does not change his spots, or change his feeling that spots are rather a credit. – Ivy Compton-Burnett

Do not look at stars as bright spots only. Try to take in the vastness of the universe. – Maria Mitchell

Talking about favourite spots, one of them is my own garden. Found with Forget-me-not spots in the header. And, another favourite spot is Copenhagen with its many attractions. Not least the exhibitions. Only an hour and a half away from my home – but at the moment inaccessible. How I miss the regular summer visit with my friends!

Finally, about connecting dots for an important whole – listen to Ban Ki-moon:

Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth… these are one and the same fight. We must connect the dots between climate change, water scarcity, energy shortages, global health, food security and women’s empowerment. Solutions to one problem must be solutions for all.

Thank you Amy, for last week’s beautiful challenge – Gardens. And thank you all for your lush, soothing and spectacular posts! There were many places to note down for a possible future visit. Hope to see you in this week’s challenge as well – very open for creativity! Don’t forget to link to my original post, and the Lens-Artists tag. Also, stay tuned for next week, when Tina will be your host. Take care and be nice.