Thursday Thoughts – A Pasque flower Walk in May

This spring is like no other spring – in so many ways. The nights are freezing cold, and many flowers and trees do not grow very much. They even say we might not have new potatoes for Midsummer (a Must…).

I nearly missed out on the Pasque flowers, and arrived just in time to see them in flower –  and faded – at the same time.

The sandy meadows stretch widely in the sun, just by the sea. We seldom go to the sea, so this was a fun opportunity for the dogs. As Milo is only two years old, he still acts like it was the first time. Jumping and bathing like crazy.

Pasque flowers have a special charm. True beauties when in flower – and another kind of delicate beauty when faded. Few flowers are bestowed this gift.

Only about ten centimeters high, they crave a crawl to show their faces.

Leaving the sea and heading to the top of the hills. You can see the Pasque flowers’ home meadow down on your right.

The forest path down again, treats you to orchids as well as other plants and flowers striving in the chilly wind.

After a couple of hours’ sunny walk in the company of our dogs, Totti wanted me to stop photographing and just MOVE ON.

That thought in his little curly head, is nicely demonstrated like this…by not following my husband any more. He just had to let him stay put and wait for me. Any dog owners who recognize this…?

 

71 comments on “Thursday Thoughts – A Pasque flower Walk in May

  1. Beautiful and poetic!!! Love the images of the ”backsipporna” … haven’t seen any since I was a child. Stunning captures. Where were you??? Stunningly beautiful of the shoreside. And lovely to see the dogs. Stay safe.

  2. Lovely to see you out and about this spring, Leya. A great walk among nature and the sea. That does sound unusual that your spring nights are cold. Here in Australia we are in autumn but the nights are like winter nights. Hopefully winter has come early and it will pass, and it won’t be a long one. Beautiful photography of the trees and flowers. Take care.

  3. Your flower photos are lovely. I have two Pasque flowers but I need to find a better place for them as they do not flower well, one is red, the other purple.

    • Ah – in the garden! Lucky you! I know they have special needs, so they might be particular about the soil. Have you posted photos of them? I’d love to see them.

  4. I read in the news even here in Norway about the possibility that Sweden might not get new potatoes for midsummer time. It’s definitely been a different spring, also here in Bergen. Last year we had record warm nights, the other we set a record cold. Nevertheless, you photos does have the lovely feeling of spring. Beautifully captured.

    • I very much appreciate your comments, Otto, thank you. This was one of the few days with tolerable spring weather. I guess you have about the same feeling in Bergen – too wet and cold. And windy. Hope for a better June. This year, 2020, is not a year of positive promises so far. Hope you are staying well and healthy.

  5. Trying to identify those flowers. I’m sure we know them by another name. It hardly matters. I was happy to follow, or even to sit in the sun with Totti 🙂 🙂

    • We do call them Pasque flowers too, as they often flower around Easter time, but they are Pulsatilla vulgaris and also known as wind flowers. They flower wild here on chalk – can’t say I have ever seen them in the wild.

      • Thank you for the info, Jude – I know their Latin name, but ”wind flowers”! Very fitting this year at least – a very windy spring. And maybe because of their delicate fading status? These are in the wild, but they are very rare here in Sweden and have a protected status. I am happy to live close to two of their major habitats in the south. Half an hour’s drive only. To me they are a real treat!

  6. Those flowers are beautiful. Here too we are having cold nights. The frost had burnt emerging new leaves on beech, oak and ash trees. It is sad to see

    • Yes – the same here. And now I worry about the migrating birds that arrived a couple of weeks ago. No insects at all. And I guess no apples. I heard we will not have potatoes for Midsummer either.

  7. what a lovely walk, Ann-Christine. the meadow and the sea and all in between! everything is beautiful! probably tired, Totti is cute! 🙂 🙂

    • You have them in your garden? How wonderful! They are difficult I think, and have special needs to work. They are quite rare in Sweden, so to see them here we have to go to a couple of special places with the actual soil.

  8. I’ve never heard of pasque flowers, so thanks for introducing these to me. They are delicate and lovely. I’m also fascinated with the field of yellow flowers in your top photo — what are these? Thanks for a lovely post today.

  9. How lovely, Pasque flowers and an orchid. But as you say – it’s cold. The air feels like it came out of the ice box, though the sun itself is hot. Most contrary and confusing. We’ve had chill winds too, but having a rest from them today.

    • Thank you, Tish – still very cold here. Don’t see how the birds from the south are going to make it without insects.

      • Ah, love storks! You have succeeded too. We have a similar program in Skåne, where I live, and the first storks had chicks in 2014. Now we have some permanent couples breeding. I just love it. Last year we had two storks walking on one of the meadows in my daily walking area. Let’s hope they will come back every year.
        Still cold here, and very much rain and hail. The blue tits come to my window sill and knock on the window as they see me. I took out the feeder again and had some frozen food for them out. Next week they say temperatures will rise some degrees and less rain. Many of my plants look sad too. Winter in May is not fun.

      • Your weather does sound grim for May. We’ve managed not to have the rain, but the icy air is still lingering. Wishing you sunshine.

  10. I missed going out to see the beauty of nature but currently I’m exploring the earth again!

  11. Haven’t noticed Pasque flowers before. Beautiful. Turns out there are common around my part of the country. Indeed, it is the state flower of South Dakota, the state that borders mine just 100 km south of our house. I’m going to have to go looking for them.

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